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Breaking up is hard to do – but will be beautiful to job seekers!

The recent announcements of energy companies to split downstream, midstream and upstream businesses into two separate units should have positive effects on job seekers in the E&P market, and here is why:

• Departures throughout the companies during the transition will occur; it is reasonable to assume that some employees will take this change as an opportunity to make a change in their own careers.

• A number of positions may need to be refilled after all is said and done:  Two organizations now have to complete their rosters, and key personnel will have to stay on with either of the companies.  This will mostly affect corporate oversight roles, HR, IT, SCM, and similar, as technical experts will probably make the move with the assets.

• While the organizations are recompleted, it is very likely that changes previously postponed and not actually related to the split will be taken care of at the same time as well.  This could affect all departments, commercial and technical and create additional hiring opportunities.

• Once the reorganizations are complete, it is easy to foresee a period of asset re-evaluations, as the new companies make sense of their balance sheets and their competitive advantages with the assets in their respective markets.  Changes of this kind will require business development and transactional experience that may or may not currently exist.

• The period of asset re-evaluation will result in newly required operational expertise.  This will cause healthy demand within the next two years after the reorganization.

• Each of the above has an effect on all those who support companies in a major reorganization from the service side.  While certain aspects and work processes will stay in-house, one can naturally assume that some outside help in refocusing the organizations’ activities will be required.

In short, changes always create opportunities.  Keep your eyes and ears open to events in the marketplace and read between the lines as press releases are issued by the companies of your interest.

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2 Responses to “Breaking up is hard to do – but will be beautiful to job seekers!”

  1. Gregory says:

    Prabhakar, Hi, If you published a paper on this than you are pabrboly more educated on it than I am so correct me if I am wrong. In a free market, a reduction in demand should correlate with a reduction in price but the whole idea of OPEC is to eliminate the free market and allow the price to be artificially high.The market isn’t free because the sellers have a disproportionate amount of control. They have banded together to act as a single seller. There are say, 500 major buying entities (countries, oil companies, individuals, etc) So the seller to buyer ratio is 1/500. If one buyer is unwilling to pay their asking price then they can move on to the next buyer. However, if there was a buying cartel then the ratio would be much closer to 1/1 and they would not be able to move on to the next buyer. This would not be a truly free marked but much closer to what exists today.

  2. Rushikesh says:

    In my opinion, P doesn’t get the recspet he deserves. He has been around forever and hasn’t put out a weak album yet. Drops heat regularly and no one places him amongst the greats. If Kimbo Price is as good as his last efforts, dude is possibly top 10 in my opinion.Maybe I am just a stan though

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